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"Antigamente os cartazes nas ruas com rostos de criminosos oferecia recompensas, hoje em dia pede votos...
E o pior é que o BRASILEIRO dá...

                          Mark Makela for The New York Times

 

It could do more to attack climate change. It could cut taxes for the middle class and poor while raising them on the rich. It could rebuild highways and invest in mass transit. It could fix the lingering problems with Obamacare. It could expand voting rights and workers' ability to join a labor union. 

Dear Times Reader,

Democrats have begun to dream. They've begun to dream of winning not only the White House and Senate but the House of Representatives too.


In our polarized country, where many people vote for one party down the ticket, Donald Trump now trails Hillary Clinton by enough that the Democrats could win the 30 net seats they need to win House control. And with both the presidency and Congress, the party could go on a binge of policy making, much as it did in 2009 and 2010.


It could do more to attack climate change. It could cut taxes for the middle class and poor while raising them on the rich. It could rebuild highways and invest in mass transit. It could fix the lingering problems with Obamacare. It could expand voting rights and workers' ability to join a labor union.


What stands between Democrats and this progressive wish list? One of the party's biggest weaknesses does.


The Democrats are not very good at winning local and statewide elections in many places. As a Democratic officeholder recently said to me: The other side is better than us at the local level.
For one thing, Democrats haven’t yet hit on a successful strategy for turning out voters in midterm elections. That hurts them in congressional and governor races, as well as in state legislatures, which in turn allows Republicans to control the gerrymandering process.


Democrats have also failed to build a strong bench of candidates. This year, Democrats did not even field a candidate in some districts. In others, the Democratic candidate seems too weak to create a competitive race. The Republican group that oversees its House campaigns recently chortled about the Democrats’ “embarrassing recruiting failures and primary losses for their chosen candidates.”


In part, Democrats failed to recruit strong candidates because they did not imagine that they might win a blowout. But that’s not really a good excuse. The stakes are too high, and the opportunity to change federal policy comes along too rarely.
What I’m Reading: PredictWise, which aggregates prediction markets, gives the Democrats a 25 percent chance of retaking the House, up from 10 percent a few weeks ago. And Jonathan Cohn of the Huffington Post has taken an in-depth look at the Democrats' policy dreams.
The full Opinion report from The Times follows, including Ross Douthat on the Republicans' missed opportunity for trying to stop Trump.


David Leonhardt
Op-Ed Columnist

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